Basic network concepts and the OSI model explained in simple terms

An introduction to learning computer networking technologyIn this chapter of the journey to learn computer networking technology we explain the OSI Reference Model in simple terms, and expand on the different layers of the OSI model.

The OSI model defines the basic building blocks of computer networking, and is an essential part of a complete understanding of modern TCI/IP networks. The theoretical OSI Reference Model is the creation of the European based International Organization for Standardization (ISO), an independent, non-governmental membership organization that creates standards in numerous areas of technology and industry.

Why is the OSI Reference Model important?

An understanding of the concepts of the OSI Reference Model is absolutely necessary for someone learning the role of the Network Administrator or the System Administrator. The OSI model is important because many certification tests use it to determine your understanding of computer networking concepts.

The Open Systems Interconnection Reference Model (OSI Reference Model or OSI Model) was originally created as the basis for designing a universal set of protocols called the OSI Protocol Suite. This suite never achieved widespread success, but the model became a very useful tool for both education and development. The model defines a set of layers and a number of concepts for their use that make understanding networks easier.

What is the best desktop computer operating system?

Which operating system is best?There is no one size fits all answer to " what is the best desktop computer operating system?" Let me first tackle the differences between Linux, Microsoft, and Apple. Hopefully the tech purists won't beat me up too much for generalizing here.

The arguments of which operating system (OS) is best often focuses on the GUI (graphical user interface). Apple focused on being graphical from the start, and Apple focused on a creating single poweruser desktop computer. They have created their own very successful world.

I work in the world of enterprise computers, that's where many computers are talking together, working together, on local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs). Some might say I have gone over to the dark side and become a Microsoft fan boy. I bashed Microsoft quite a bit over the years for inefficient operating systems. After spending more than 20 years working with Microsoft products in the enterprise environment I have come to appreciate Microsoft and all the technology they have created.

Linux is a Unix-like computer operating system. When I was teaching I always remember a line from a song when I described Unix, "It wasn't build for comfort it was built for speed." Command line functions, the non GUI stuff, is important to the people who use Unix. A lot of Linux, like Unix, is used by people running it on servers, they don't care about the GUI. That's why there are so many distributions of Linux, some are geared to people using it mainly for server based applications, and some Linux Distros focus on a pretty GUI. Distro is a shortened version of the term distribution. We will discuss popular Linux distros in our next article.

Common technology questions and basic computer concepts

Common questions and basic computer concepts for the home userIn this section we are covering common questions and basic computer concepts from the perspective of a typical home user. The first question is obviously, "What computer should I buy?"

Anyone who answers your question "What computer should I buy?" without first asking a few questions back, does not understand the question.

How much computer do you need?

Too often people set out shopping for a computer without first making a list of what they expect the computer to do for them. This is the most common reason for unfulfilled expectations when it comes to technology.

Technology is ever changing, at a very rapid pace. Depending on your level of technical knowledge, expectations of what technology can do will vary widely. Even those who have been around technology for years will sometime make the most common of errors by buying individual devices, without planning how they fit into the total picture. In business today you hear a lot about the thirty thousand foot view. It's all about looking at the total picture, rather than any one thing.

Never lose sight of the fact that technology is just a tool. The finest tools do not turn a novice craftsman into a master. Your financial adviser will tell you the importance of sound financial planning, so if so if you view a computer as a tool to automate your life, it makes sense to plan your technology purchases. Planning involves some work, but all you need to get started is a pencil and paper.

Starting on a piece of paper, write down your thoughts on a few basic questions. What is in it for me, what benefits do you expect from the system? If you could have anything, what would it be? What would you like to have available to you?


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