TCP/IP

Computer networking packet switching explained in simple terms

Packet switching explained in simple termsThroughout the standard for Internet Protocol you will see the description of packet switching, "fragment and reassemble internet datagrams when necessary for transmission through small packet networks." A message is divided into smaller parts know as packets before they are sent. Each packet is transmitted individually and can even follow different routes to its destination. Once all the packets forming a message arrive at the destination, they are recompiled into the original message.

Internet data, whether in the form of a Web page, a downloaded file or an e-mail message, travels over a system known as a packet-switching network. Each of these packages gets a wrapper that includes information on the sender's address, the receiver's address, the package's place in the entire message, and how the receiving computer can be sure that the package arrived intact.

There are two huge advantages to the packet switching. The network can balance the load across various pieces of equipment on a millisecond-by-millisecond basis. If there is a problem with one piece of equipment in the network while a message is being transferred, packets can be routed around the problem, ensuring the delivery of the entire message.

The Internet Family of Protocols The TCP/IP protocol suite

TCP/IP protocol suite graphiicThe Internet Model of computer networking is not merely a reduced version of the OSI Reference Model with a straight line comparison of the four layers of the TCP/IP model to seven layers of the OSI model, as we explain here, and in the next page on the difference between the Internet and OSI reference model

The Internet protocol suite commonly known as TCP/IP is a set of communications protocols used for the Internet and similar networks. TCP/IP is not a single protocol, but rather an entire family of protocols.

The network concept of protocols establishes a set of rules for each system to speak the others language in order for them to communicate. Protocols describe both the format that a message must take as well as the way in which messages are exchanged between computers.

Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the Internet Protocol (IP), were the first two members of the family to be defined, consider them the parents of the family. Protocol stack describes a layered set of protocols working together to provide a set of network functions. Each protocol/layer services the layer above by using the layer below.

What is the difference between the Internet and OSI reference model

Photo: Interface Message Processor (IMP) ARPANET packet routingWhen learning computer networking it is essential to have a general idea of the different computer networking reference models and the reasoning behind the layered approach. Both the TCP/IP network model and the OSI Model create a reference model for computer networking. The OSI model is widely used to teach students as was created in the mindset of a reference book. The TCP/IP standards were created to provide guidance to people actually implementing a networking technology and was created in the mindset of a service manual. Much like the answer to the question of why was the internet created, the answer to why do we need the OSI model depends on who you ask. Here at ComputerGuru.net try to explain the basics of the OSI model as it relates to understanding basic computer networking.

The Internet and the TCP/IP family of protocols evolved separately from the OSI model. Often you find teachers, and websites, making direct comparison of the different models. Don't get too hung up on drawing direct comparisons between the two models. Our discussion here on the two networking reference models is address some commonly asked questions, and give some historical perspective as to how the models have evolved.

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