What is the difference between the Internet and OSI reference model

Photo: Interface Message Processor (IMP) ARPANET packet routingWhen learning computer networking it is essential to have a general idea of the different computer networking reference models and the reasoning behind the layered approach. Both the TCP/IP network model and the OSI Model create a reference model for computer networking. The OSI model is widely used to teach students as was created in the mindset of a reference book. The TCP/IP standards were created to provide guidance to people actually implementing a networking technology and was created in the mindset of a service manual. Much like the answer to the question of why was the internet created, the answer to why do we need the OSI model depends on who you ask. Here at ComputerGuru.net try to explain the basics of the OSI model as it relates to understanding basic computer networking.

The Internet and the TCP/IP family of protocols evolved separately from the OSI model. Often you find teachers, and websites, making direct comparison of the different models. Don't get too hung up on drawing direct comparisons between the two models. Our discussion here on the two networking reference models is address some commonly asked questions, and give some historical perspective as to how the models have evolved.

The OSI model explained in simple terms

OSI Model Illustrated graphicLearning technology isn't sexy, but I am doing my best to keep it interesting. Here I take on the complex subject of the Computer Networking OSI model explained in simple terms. In our previous article, Understanding the mystical OSI Model explained in simple terms we used an analogy to illustrate the OSI model.

Why is the OSI Reference Model important?

Simply put the OSI Reference Model is a THEORETICAL model describing a standard of computer networking. The TCP/IP Reference model is based on the ACTUAL standards of the internet which are defined in the collection of Request for Comments (RFC) documents started by Steve Crocker in 1969 to help record unofficial notes on the development of ARPANET. RFCs have since become official documents of Internet specifications.

The OSI model is important because many certification tests use it to determine your understanding of computer networking concepts. The OSI Reference Model is an attempt to create a set of computer networking standards by the International Standards Organization. A "Reference Model" is a set of text book definitions. You often learn something new by first learning text book definitions. The common protocol suite of computer networking is TCP/IP. The geeks who created TCP/IP were not as anal in creating a pretty "reference model." TCP/IP evolved over many years as it went from a theory to the concept of the internet.

Understanding the mystical OSI Model explained in simple terms

 Understanding computer network technologyAs you begin your quest to learn computer networking one of the first tasks you have before you is a basic understanding of the OSI model.

For many folks understanding the OSI model is like trying to understand some mystical formula that controls the way computer networks operate.

As we help you to begin your journey to understanding computer networking We will tackle explaining the complex subject of the computer networking OSI model simple terms in hopes that you will gain an understanding of the reasons behind the definitions

You can find a lot of resources that define the components of the OSI model, but an understanding of the reasons behind the definitions will go a lot way to fully understanding this complex technology model.

The acronym and the organization behind it can get confusing. The formal name for the OSI model is the Open Systems Interconnection model. Open Systems refers to a cooperative effort to have development of hardware and software among many vendors that could be used together. The model is a product of the International Organization for Standardization (2) which is often abbreviated ISO.

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